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  • Protecting Biodiversity

    Biodiversity is the variety of different types of life that exist within a particular ecosystem or on the planet as a whole. It is an important aspect of the natural world and is essential for the health and functioning of ecosystems. There are many different factors that contribute to biodiversity, including the number and variety of species within an ecosystem, the genetic diversity within each species, and the complexity of the relationships between species. Biodiversity is important because it provides a wide range of benefits to both humans and the natural world. For example, biodiversity plays a vital role in maintaining the balance of the natural world and the ecosystem services that are essential for human survival, such as clean air and water, soil fertility, and pollination of crops. Biodiversity is also important for the economic well-being of humans, as many industries, such as agriculture, forestry, and tourism, rely on the natural world to provide resources and services. Unfortunately, biodiversity is under threat from a variety of human activities, including habitat destruction, pollution, and climate change. The loss of biodiversity can have serious consequences, including the extinction of species and the disruption of ecosystems. To help protect biodiversity, it is important to take steps to conserve and protect natural habitats, manage natural resources sustainably, and reduce the impact of human activities on the natural world. This can include activities such as protecting endangered species, restoring damaged habitats, and implementing sustainable land use practices. By taking these steps, we can help to preserve the diversity of life on our planet for future generations.

  • Environmental Conservation

    Environmental conservation is the protection, preservation, and management of the natural environment and its resources. It is a multifaceted issue that involves protecting natural habitats, preserving biodiversity, and reducing pollution and waste. One of the main drivers of environmental degradation is human activity, such as the burning of fossil fuels, deforestation, and the overconsumption of natural resources. These activities contribute to climate change, loss of biodiversity, and pollution, all of which have significant impacts on the natural world and on human health. There are many ways in which individuals can contribute to environmental conservation. One of the most effective ways is to reduce our environmental footprint by consuming less, recycling and reusing materials, and using renewable energy sources. We can also support conservation efforts by purchasing products from companies that are environmentally responsible, and by supporting organizations that work to protect the natural world. Another important aspect of environmental conservation is the protection of natural habitats and the species that live within them. This includes protecting forests, oceans, and other ecosystems from destruction and degradation. It also involves working to preserve endangered species and helping them to recover from population declines. In addition to protecting natural habitats, it is also important to address pollution and waste. This includes reducing the amount of plastic we use, properly disposing of hazardous materials, and cleaning up contaminated sites. Overall, environmental conservation is essential for the well-being of the natural world and for the health and prosperity of future generations. By taking steps to reduce our environmental impact and protect the natural world, we can help to ensure a healthy and sustainable planet for all.

  • Top 10 Environmental Problems Our Planet Is Facing

    Top 10 Environmental Problems Our Planet Is Facing We made an effort to compile and prioritize the list of the top 10 environmental problems facing the world, despite the fact that the list may only be, at best, "subjective." 1. Over Population The overpopulation of humans is without a doubt the biggest problem the environment is currently facing. Since we are overpopulating the planet, all other significant environmental problems stem from this. In the past 60 years, the population of the world has tripled, putting a strain on all facets of the environment. Every day, more land is developed to accommodate the urbanization of the area. The population increased from 2,555,982,611 in 1950 to over 7,382,200,400 in 2015. The population of the world has actually increased by almost three times, according to the math. Considered in its entirety, that is astounding. That figure is increasing even as we speak! 2. Climate Change Climate change is the top environmental concern and is also the most divisive and political. The vast majority of climate scientists now agree that human activity is influencing the climate now and that the tipping point has been reached. In other words, it is too late to reverse the environmental harm caused by climate change. The best we can do at this point is control future environmental impact by creating more environmentally friendly energy production methods and reducing the mining and burning of fossil fuels. 3. Loss of Biodiversity Human behavior has a direct impact on the loss of biodiversity on the planet. The habitats of various species have been destroyed by humans and are still being destroyed today. The elimination of one species has a ripple effect throughout the food chain, upsetting the interconnected ecosystems. The devastating effects of biodiversity loss are likely to continue to plague the planet for millions of years. "The Sixth Extinction" is another name for the current extinction of biodiversity. 4. Phosphorous and Nitrogen Cycles Although the impact of human activity on the carbon cycle is better understood, the less well-known impact on the nitrogen cycle has a more significant environmental impact. One of the most useful technologies for the human race has been the use and abuse of nitrogen for many years. An estimated 120 million tons of atmospheric nitrogen are converted annually by humans into reactive forms like nitrates, primarily for use in the manufacture of fertilizers for crops and as food additives. Crop runoff into our oceans has a detrimental impact on phytoplankton, which is in charge of generating the majority of the oxygen in our atmosphere. 5. Water Supply According to a lot of experts, water will soon start to trade like gold and oil. Wars will be fought over who controls the water supply, according to some experts. Currently, one-third of all people do not have adequate access to fresh, clean water. The figure is expected to increase by up to two-thirds by 2050. That is, there won't be clean water available to two-thirds of the world's population! Overpopulation, excessive demand, and industrial pollution are to blame. 6. Ocean Acidification This is a result of excessive CO2 production. The oceans take in up to 25% of all human carbon dioxide emissions. Following this, the gas reacts with other substances to form new compounds, such as carbolic acid. In the past 250 years, the ocean's surface acidity has increased by about 30%. The acidity is predicted to rise by 150% by the year 2100. Human osteoporosis and excessive ocean acidification both affect plankton and shellfish in similar ways. The acid is effectively destroying the skeletons of the creatures. Ocean acidification may soon present marine life with difficulties that have not previously existed on Earth in millions of years. 7. Pollution Chemical compounds that cause pollution of the air, water, and soil take a long time to degrade. The majority of these chemicals are byproducts of our contemporary way of life and are produced by industry and vehicle exhaust. Air pollution is only one type of pollution. Another area where pollution is beginning to spread is the soil. Plastic, nitrates, and heavy metals are examples of typical toxic substances. Human waste that is in the form of plastic frequently finds its way into the ocean. Since the pollution is frequently carried out to sea by prevailing winds, these plastics frequently go unnoticed by humans. 8. Ozone Layer Depletion Our ozone layer's depletion has primarily been linked to the discharge of chemical pollution that contains the chemicals chlorine and bromide. The largest hole, which forms over the Antarctic, is caused by the chemicals breaking up ozone molecules once they reach the upper atmosphere. Most of the sun's harmful UV rays that can harm living tissue are absorbed by the atmosphere. CFCs have been outlawed in numerous manufacturing procedures and products in an effort to lessen this process. The Environmental Protection Agency claims that one chlorine atom can disintegrate more than 100,000 ozone molecules. 9. Overfishing It is predicted that there won't be any fish in the sea by 2050. The overfishing of the oceans by humans to meet the demand for seafood from an ever-increasing population is to blame for the extinction of many fish species. One such instance of how people have used the planet's natural resources to the point of extinction is the collapse of the Atlantic Cod Fishery. 10. Deforestation Half of the world's rainforests have been destroyed since 1990. At an alarming rate, forests are still being cleared. A more recent occurrence has been added to the list, which is concerning. Trees are now dying globally at a rate never before seen. Let's take action now rather than waiting until tomorrow to prevent an environmental meltdown.

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Programs (167)

  • Sustainable Development 101: Ways 2 Secure Future

    This course introduces the interdisciplinary field of sustainable development and draws upon the most recent developments in the social and physical sciences. It discusses the intricate relationships between the global economy and the natural world as well as the problems associated with development that is both socially and environmentally sustainable. In addition to addressing the problems of environmentally sustainable and socially inclusive development, it describes the intricate relationships between the global economy and the natural environment of the planet. By the end of this course, students will have gained a broad overview of the critical challenges and potential solutions for achieving growth in the 21st century. You can expect to learn: An Introduction to Sustainable Development The impact of individuals on inequality, poverty, health, and human rights The function of the planet, including its boundaries, the importance of renewable energy sources, and how to use our natural resources sustainably. How to promote economic growth while ensuring that no one is left behind.

  • Introduction

    About This Course This course introduces the interdisciplinary field of sustainable development and draws upon the most recent developments in the social and physical sciences. It discusses the intricate relationships between the global economy and the natural world as well as the problems associated with development that is both socially and environmentally sustainable. In addition to addressing the problems of environmentally sustainable and socially inclusive development, it describes the intricate relationships between the global economy and the natural environment of the planet. By the end of this course, students will have gained a broad overview of the critical challenges and potential solutions for achieving growth in the 21st century. Course Learning Objectives You can expect to learn: An Introduction to Sustainable Development The impact of individuals on inequality, poverty, health, and human rights The function of the planet, including its boundaries, the importance of renewable energy sources, and how to use our natural resources sustainably. How to promote economic growth while ensuring that no one is left behind. This course is self-paced, which means you can complete the content anytime.

  • Syllabus

    Module 1: What is Sustainable Development? Chapter 1: Introduction to Sustainable Development Chapter 2: Economic Growth and Progress Chapter 3: Continuing Poverty Chapter 4: Environmental Threats Chapter 5: Business As Usual Versus Sustainable Development Chapter 6: From the MDGs to the SDGs: Agenda 2030 Module 2: Economic Development – How We Measure It, How It Varies Around the World Chapter 1: Incomes Around the World Chapter 2: Urban/Rural Inequality Chapter 3: Income Inequality Within Countries Chapter 4: Measuring Well-being Chapter 5: Convergence or Divergence? Module 3: A Short History of Economic Development Chapter 1: Economic Development is New, Starting Around 1750 Chapter 2: The Industrial Revolution Starts in England Chapter 3: The Great Waves of Technological Change Chapter 4: The Diffusion of Economic Growth Chapter 5: Economic Development Since World War II: The Making of Globalization Module 4: Why Did Some Countries Advance While Others Remained in Poverty? Chapter 1: The Idea of Clinical Economics Chapter 2: The Role of Physical Geography: Transport, Energy, Disease, Crops Chapter 3: The Role of Culture: Demography, Education, Gender Chapter 4: The Role of Politics Chapter 5: Which Countries Are Still Stuck in Poverty? Module 5: The MDGs and the End of Extreme Poverty Chapter 1: The Reasons to Believe that Extreme Poverty Can Be Ended Chapter 2: A Strategy to End Extreme Poverty in Africa Chapter 3: South Asia: The Continuing Challenge of the Food Supply Chapter 4: A Closer Look at Official Development Assistance Chapter 5: Designing Practical Interventions: The Case of Millennium Villages Module 6: Growth within Planetary Boundaries Chapter 1: The Origins of the Boundary Concept: Thomas Malthus Chapter